This child represents Jeannette Walls as a child, living through poverty and seeking fortune as an adult.

Poverty & Vanity

This child represents Jeannette Walls as a child, living through poverty and seeking fortune as an adult.

Poverty & Vanity

Reblogged from Amanda Mustard
Reblogged from LIVE OUT LOUD
Reblogged from Kick Rocks
sedentaryskylines:

“One time I saw a tiny Joshua tree sapling growing not too far from the old tree. I wanted to dig it up and replant it near our house. I told Mom that I would protect it from the wind and water it every day so that it could grow nice and tall and straight. Mom frowned at me. “You’d be destroying what makes it special,” she said. “It’s the Joshua tree’s struggle that gives it its beauty.” ― Jeannette Walls, The Glass Castle

sedentaryskylines:

“One time I saw a tiny Joshua tree sapling growing not too far from the old tree. I wanted to dig it up and replant it near our house. I told Mom that I would protect it from the wind and water it every day so that it could grow nice and tall and straight. Mom frowned at me. “You’d be destroying what makes it special,” she said. “It’s the Joshua tree’s struggle that gives it its beauty.” 
― Jeannette Walls, The Glass Castle

Bad Child

We had such high

Expectations

For the

Child

But He

Let us

Down.

So we

Punished him.

Bad Child!

Bad Child!

We had such

Great plans

For you

but you

Ruined it all

By becomming

Yourself.

-James W. Harris

Individuality

"There comes a time when you have to stand up and shout:

This is me damn it! I look the way i look, I think the way I think, I feel the way I feel, I love the way I love! I am a complex package. Take me…or leave me. Accept me-or walk away! Do not try and make me feel like less of a person, just because I don’t fit your idea of who I should be and don’t try and change me to fit your mold. If I need to change, I alone will make that decision. When you are strong enough to love yourself 100%, good and bad- you will be amazed at the opportunities that life presents you.”

-Stacey Charter

individualism

in·di·vid·u·al·ism

noun

  1. the habit or principle of being independent and self-reliant.

Jeannette comes to terms with the fact that her parents were incompetent in regards to taking care of her and her siblings, which ultimately resulted in her seeking complete independence and leaving home. Her individualism allowed her to grow as a person and accept her past and her parents, and she is now able to take care of her mother, who is unable to take care of herself.

"Mom told us that we were actually doing the animals a favor by not allowing them to become dependent on us. That way, if we ever had to leave, they’d be able to get by on their own."

Although Jeannette’s mother said this in passing, it describes her views on raising children. Rose Mary takes care of her children, but at the same time she gives them a drastic amount of independence. The way that her mother allows the animals to get their own food is similar to the way that the Walls children are sometimes forced to forage around and find their own methods of getting food. Jeannette’s mother’s outlook on animals represents her views on childhood, and represents the independence Jeannette and her siblings gained as they grew up.

— Jeannette Walls, The Glass Castle